By
Pace Law

Keeping yourself safe after the Covid-19 lockdown

March 9, 2020

By some estimates, we in Ontario have passed the peak of coronavirus infections. Talk has now turned to how the province will allow people to return to normal life, without risking a second surge in Covid-19 cases.

It is imperative to remember that, even when the easing of the lockdown in Canada begins, that will not mean the novel coronavirus has been completely eradicated. Rather, it will signal that the authorities have decided that the infection rates have been reduced to a level which is ‘manageable,’ and does not pose a threat that will overwhelm the healthcare system. It is vital that once the coronavirus ‘stay at home’ restrictions end, you continue to take the precautions to keep yourself, your family, friends, and colleagues safe.

Everyone at Pace Law extends their heartiest gratitude to healthcare workers, public transport personnel, and all those who have continued to provide essential services during these tough times. You have kept us all safe at home while bearing a real risk to your health. Thank you.

Explaining social distancing, self-isolation, and quarantine

There is no known vaccine or medically proven cure for Covid-19 at this time, nor is there likely to be a vaccine or therapeutic in the near future. Consequently, the Canadian government has chosen to adopt prevention as its primary mode of responding to the pandemic. In doing so, the aim is to keep people safe, and to slow the rate of infection. What started as measures for asking anyone who had spent time outside the country to self-isolate became a widespread ‘lockdown’.  There are three terms you will have heard frequently on the news: “social distancing,” “self-isolation,” and “quarantine.” These are degrees of preventative measures that are implemented according to the level of risk an individual poses regarding the transmission of Covid-19.

Social distancing – Reducing time spent in public places; keeping 2 to 4 metres away from other people in public.

Self-isolation – Staying at home if you have returned from a trip abroad and are showing symptoms of Covid-19, or have been diagnosed with Covid-19, but are exhibiting only mild symptoms.

Quarantine – An Order by public health to self-isolate for a set amount of time (usually 14 days); the Order is issued under the Quarantine Act, and violators can face fines and criminal prosecution.

How social distancing and the ‘lockdown’ is expected to be relaxed

Toronto’s Mayor, John Tory, gave an idea about how the city and the province should expect the lockdown to end.

“We’re going to do it carefully, we’re going to it methodically and we’re going to, most importantly, do it safely based on public health advice”.

All signs point to social distancing measures being relaxed gradually after the Covid-19 lockdown. A controlled opening of schools, businesses, and outdoor activities is expected after May. Regardless of how the lockdown ends, it will take concerted community efforts to prevent a resurgence of infections.

How to keep yourself and your loved ones safe after the Covid-19 social distancing measures are relaxed

We would suggest continued precautions as the coronavirus lockdown is relaxed. People should continue to take these precautions until such time that public health officials advise Covid-19 has been controlled or eradicated:

  • Remain vigilant about hygiene when out and about
  • Continue a strict and regular hand-washing regimen
  • Try and stay home as much as possible to reduce the risk of transmission
  • Avoid travel on public transport and ride-sharing taxis
  • Make full use of online ordering and door-to-door deliveries
  • Avoid international travel if possible
  • Continue to wear approved facial masks and facial coverings
  • Regularly disinfect surfaces that you touch frequently
  • Do not share personal items (and equipment in the workplace)
  • Strictly follow public health advice to minimize the risk of transmission
  • Make sure to get vaccinated against Covid-19 (once available)

We understand that the lockdown has posed significant challenges for many. This is especially true for those who are receiving treatment to address significant injuries and impairments they have suffered in an accident, while continuing to seek justice. In these unprecedented circumstances, the degree of uncertainty involved constitutes a very significant additional stressor. Throughout this crisis, Pace Law has stood firmly by our clients. We have made our services as contactless as possible, while ensuring that those in need continue to receive justice and the treatment they need. Our offices have continued to function normally, albeit remotely, and we continue to be devoted to helping accident victims receive fair compensation, as well as the treatment they require.

Read more

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191 The West Mall, Suite 1100
Toronto, ON M9C 5K8
Phone: 1-877-236-3060
Fax: 416-236-1809

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